Tag: junior high

Friendship Lesson

This lesson comes to you from Katelyn Propper….once again, THANK YOU for sharing and helping us all be great together! The Friendship lesson can be taught as an E-Learning assignment, but also would be a great addition to the traditional classroom if you teach about healthy interpersonal relationships. I know I intend to incorporate Katelyn’s Friendship lesson into my Individual & Family Studies class in the next school year!

Grain Bowl E-Learning Assignment

THANK YOU to Nikki Heflin for sharing her Grain Bowl E-Learning Assignment! This is a wonderful collection of notes, assignments and lab options! I can’t express how happy it makes my heart that so many of you are willing to share your ideas so that we may all get through this distance learning together and successfully! As I always say, “Let’s be Great Together”! If you are collecting flex lessons, I hope you add this Grain Bowl E-Learning assignment to it!

Kitchen Tools E-Learning Assignment

Since no one is quite sure what the next school year will look like, I’ve been working on updating some of my lessons for remote learning…just in case! This Kitchen Tools E-Learning Assignment comes to you early as I had a teacher request for some engaging ways to teach kitchen tools remotely. Not only can this Kitchen Tools E-Learning assignment be used in remote learning, but could also be used in the regular classroom.

Baby Sign Language Project for E-Learning

Another THANK YOU to Katelyn Propper who has shared back her adaptation of my original Baby Sign Language lesson. Katelyn’s version of Baby Sign Language Project for E-Learning is set up for remote learning and covers all of the information using a variety of technologies. Read on to see how she’s done this in her Baby Sign Language Project for E-Learning!

Reading a New Food Label

Reading and deciphering a food label is like learning a foreign language to many students! Some get it quickly and easily, some don’t and require more practice! Reading a new food label is an interactive lesson that has students cutting, pasting, and annotating various pieces of label information before learning how to decipher the numbers to determine its healthfulness. Once students understand the concept, their label reading skills can be reinforced by practicing on empty food containers!

Advertising Part II: Food Themed Sneaker Project

Thanks for checking back in for the Advertising Part II: Food Themed Sneaker Project. This project gave students an opportunity to build on their advertising knowledge and apply it in a fun and creative way. Afterall, who doesn’t love fun, food inspired footwear!

Advertising Lesson: Part I

One of the special topics I like to teach when time permits is a mini-unit on advertising. This Advertising Lesson: Part I is the lesson before the project. It introduces students to a variety of information they need to know about advertising before they can complete the project in a very interactive and hands-on way. The project will be shared next week as this post would be ginormous if I didn’t split it up. So, please check out both weeks to see the entire mini-unit and project.

Infants in Motion: A Physical Development Video Project

When teaching about the physical development of infants, I like to assign Infants in Motion: A Physical Development Video Project to my students so they can see the growth and development sequentially. Before students can put their video together, they must understand what is happening and, therefore, must do a bit of research. Read on to see how I introduce and build up to this assignment.

A Glo-Bowl Affair

Sharing another Struggle Meal lesson that I presented at the Missouri FACS conference last summer! This lesson titled, A Glo-Bowl Affair, is a fun, engaging lesson that was inspired by both Frankie Celenza’s Struggle Meal Grain Bowl episode and by activities suggested in the EduProtocol Field Guide (amazon affiliate). I hope your students find this lesson and all of its activities as enjoyable as mine did!

Whole Grains

When teaching about whole grains, I like to cover the following six categories: wheat, oats, rye, rice, corn and barley. I do this as an overview because it’s a great way to introduce and expose students to a variety of whole grains that can be incorporated into different meals. After all, 100% whole grains are part of a healthy, nutritious diet!