Category: Nutrition

Fad Diet Project

It seems like every few months a new diet is proposed that is supposed to “really work,” unlike those other diets. This lesson is intended to provoke class discussion, emphasize critical thinking, and allow students to practice their ability to make and defend an opinion.

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Choose MyPlate Lessons, Worksheets, Activities

Since the new FDA food guide recommendations came out we’ve all scrambled to revamp our nutrition lessons to meet the new requirements. Since it has been a few months there are new resources available that you should be aware of. You’ll find links, lesson plans, power points, worksheets, and products to help you stay on top of the changes.

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USDA Food Pyramid Replaced by Food Guide Dinner Plate

The new “Choose My Plate” campaign has been launched starring a colorful yet simple place setting. The cost of changing the food recommendation icon for the US is $2 million dollars. Hopefully the money spent on this campaign will pay off in health care savings as people use this new food guide to eat healthier. That’s where Family and Consumer Science teachers come into play. Teachers have power to influence, train, and instruct students in the right way to do lots of things.

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Choose My Plate Lesson Plan

With the new food guide plate replacing the pyramid, it is time to change nutrition lesson plans to get on board. This lesson introduces students to the new myplate food guide by having them create three nutritionally sound plates according to the government guidelines. They will have to look through grocery flyers and cut out items that make up their three plates- breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Additionally, they will determine the recommended portion sizes of each item they put on their plate.

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New Food Pyramid- I mean Plate

The United State’s 20 year old food guide pyramid is soon to be replaced with a new dinner plate design. Stay tuned for the newest information about the latest food guide and new nutrition lessons for your students based on this release, June 2nd.

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Family and Consumer Sciences Course Expectations & Outlines

Need some ideas on how to construct your course or write curriculum? Here are a few examples from other Family Consumer Science programs!

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Fast Food Fanatic Project

There has been a lot of hype and a nation wide stirring about Fast Food over the past couple years thanks to movies like Super Size Me and Food, Inc.
Most recently Fast Food hit the news again as a photographer startled the world with pictures of “the indestructible happy meal” that looked exactly the same for over six months that it was on her shelf the only difference being that it was hard as a rock. So I ask my students to do a similar experiment decomposing fast food in my classroom window, make their own predictions, take pictures, and finally draw their own conclusions.

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Fed up with Lunch: The School Lunch Project

I came across this blog that is written on school lunch by an anonymous teacher that goes by Mrs. Q. She has made a project out of eating school lunch every day and documents the progress. She is an advocate for improving the national school lunch program. Interesting read if you have time.

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Food Inc. Lesson Plan

Food Inc. (DVD): If you haven’t watched this documentary I would highly recommend it!
In Food, Inc., filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the veil on our nation’s food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that has been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government’s regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA. Our nation’s food supply is now controlled by a handful of corporations that often put profit ahead of consumer health, the livelihood of the American farmer, the safety of workers and our own environment. We have bigger-breasted chickens, the perfect pork chop, herbicide-resistant soybean seeds, even tomatoes that won’t go bad, but we also have new strains of E. coli—the harmful bacteria that causes illness for an estimated 73,000 Americans annually. We are riddled with widespread obesity, particularly among children, and an epidemic level of diabetes among adults

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