Leavening Agents Lab

In this lesson, baking soda, baking powder, and yeast are compared and contrasted through lab experimentation with the three leavening agents.

Time Frame: 52 Minutes
Class Size: 24

Objectives

  • The students will understand which chemical reactions occur that cause baked goods to rise. By gaining this knowledge, the students will be able to predict what will happen when a recipe is followed. The students will learn to expect the same results repeatedly if they measure accurately and follow the procedures for the recipe exactly. The students will apply the concept of leavening agents across various recipes, replicating results in each recipe. The students will transfer results from scientific experimentation to food preparation. From this experience the students will know the scientific nomenclature for the reactions of baking soda, baking powder and yeast, and be able to apply this knowledge in the production of baked goods.

Materials

  • Baking soda
  • Baking powder
  • Yeast
  • Cider Vinegar
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Liquid measuring cups
  • Instant read thermometers
  • Glass bowls
  • Measuring spoons

Background for Teachers

  • Baking soda needs acid to react.
  • Yeast needs sugar to react.
  • Salt slows the reaction of yeast.
  • All 3 leavening agents studied today produce carbon dioxide gas.

Instructional Procedures

1.      Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80 – 90 degree water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of baking powder. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

2. Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because_____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80-90 degree water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of baking powder. And 1 teaspoon vinegar.  Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

3.      Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80-90 degree water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of baking soda. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

4.   Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80-90 degree water and 1 tablespoon vinegar into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of baking soda. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

5.  Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of ice cold water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of yeast. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

6.  Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80 – 90 degrees water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of yeast. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

7.     Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of water into a 2 cup liquid measuring cup.
•       Bring to a boil in the microwave. Remove from microwave.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of yeast. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results below.

8. Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80 – 90 degrees water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of yeast. Add 1 teaspoon sugar. Stir.

•       Observe. Record results (see attachment)

9.  Hypothesis:  If I ______, then I think____ will happen because____.

Procedure:
•       Measure 8 ounces of 80 – 90 degrees water into a small bowl.
•       Add 1 teaspoon of yeast. Add 1 teaspoon sugar. Add 1 teaspoon salt. Stir.
•       Observe. Record results (see attachment)

Follow-Up questions:

  1. What did you notice happening when all of the leavening agents were “working”?  How might this allow a baked good to rise?
  2. If you have a recipe that uses yeast, what would be required for the baked good to rise, based on your experiments?
  3. If you have a recipe with an acidic ingredient (like vinegar or buttermilk), what might be a good leavening agent to result in a good rise?
  4. If you want a baked good that uses baking powder to rise, what conditions should be present, based on your experiments?

Activities

  • Hypothesize about how leavening agents work in the presence of various ingredients.
  • Observe how leavening agents work.
  • Complete lab questions worksheet

Closure

  • Oral summary of what was done and learned in lab today.

Evaluation/Assessment

  • Students will complete writing a recipe that is missing the leavening agent. The students will then prepare the recipe and eat. Chocolate chip cookies or a yeast roll recipe is suggested.

Attachments

Similar Lessons

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

1 comment for “Leavening Agents Lab

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *