Category: Child Development

Age Appropriate Toys– Activity

What child doesn’t like playing with toys?  When my children were young, they received a lot of toys from family and friends.  Some of those toys were appropriate and safe for their age and abilities and others were too advanced and were put back for a later time.  To some people, toys are toys and safety, age and ability play no part in their selection.  I like to provide my students with an overview of the types of toys recommended for each age and stage of a child’s early years.  After discussing some criteria to keep in mind, the best way to evaluate or analyze a toy for age appropriateness is to actually play with them. So, the toy stations go up and the big kids “play” and utilize their resources to help them determine the toy’s age/stage and justify their answer.  This is always a fun activity as students see and explore new toys they’ve never had or played with, along with reminiscing about those they did play with, as youngsters!   No toys?  No worries as I’ve included an alternate activity to accomplish the same thing!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

DAP: Developmentally Appropriate Practice

If you teach child development or a related course where students are learning about or developing materials for young children, you are most likely teaching about developmentally appropriate practice.  We all know as educators that children and activities are not all created equal!  This lesson introduces students to this concept with an interactive introductory activity and then continues with student exploration of the concept and what it entails.  Students also explore what can happen when developmentally appropriate practices are ignored.  Finally students participate in a variety of activity stations to determine if DAP or not!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

COPE24 Parenting Program (sponsored post)

With Abuse and Other Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on the Rise, St. Louis-based COPE24 Launches Curriculum to Teach High School Students Vital Skills to Help Prevent Future Traumas and to Strengthen the American Family.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

You Be the Dietician–Breakfast Foods

Do you teach an Advanced Foods and Nutrition class?  Looking for a rigorous assignment for students who have a strong understanding of the nutrients? You are in luck as Nikki Heflin, a Family and Consumer Sciences teacher of Indiana shares this breakfast lesson, several lab ideas and concluding assessment, placing students in the role of the dietician.  Check out her lesson below!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Pop-Up Family Structures

I’m finding that my students do better when they have a good balance of “hands-on” activities mixed with technology. So, in this feature you will find my version of a “pop-up” style activity that revolves around the family structures. Students work in small groups to complete a “pop-up” of their assigned family structure, incorporating additional information. The “pop-ups” are then displayed and students participate in a gallery walk to learn more about each of the unique family structures.  See below for more details!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

First Aid Injury Scenarios: Flipgrid Style

If you teach a unit on handling childhood injuries, this lesson is a must for you to try! After learning about Flipgrid through a teacher in-service, Diane Senkoski, a sixth grade FACS teacher from Pennsylvania,  created a super engaging lesson for students of all ages, using the free app. Even if you are not a 1:1 school or have access to technology, the lesson can be easily adapted for live performances!  So, what are you waiting for…set up your free Fligprid account and get started!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Sleep Safety & SIDS Lesson & Activities

This is such an important topic to teach about, one I’ve honestly struggled with over the years. However, when teaching about infant safety this school year, I decided it was high time I put my trepidation aside and created the below lesson and activities.  I’m not sure I’ve given the topic the justice it deserves, but it’s a start!  As always, if you have additional ideas, please share in the comment section.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Family Definition Media Activity

Many years ago, I was given a definition while taking a graduate course about the family.  Through the years, I have often used it as a poster project lead-in to my family unit.  However, since going 1:1, I decided to try this assignment a new way, using technology…aka iMovie!  While I’m not an expert with this app, my students are and they were eager to assist their peers when necessary.  I even surprised myself by creating a YouTube channel so I could share a couple of student samples with you!  Not a 1:1 school or have access to technology–no worries!  I’ve included my original poster assignment (see attachments), which by the way could be easily modified for the differentiated classroom. I loved seeing how each student interpreted the family definition and how unique and diverse each movie was…just like families!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Fingerplays

How many of you remember fingerplays such as “Where is Thumbkin” or “This Little Piggy”?  These along with many others were a favorite with my own children and I’m sure with many of yours too!  This fun and interactive activity was shared by Lauren Williams from McCracken County High School, Paducah, Kentucky where she teaches a variety of Child Development, Child Services and Parenting classes. If your students enjoyed learning about nursery rhymes, they’re going to love creating their own original fingerplays!  So, check out her ideas below and let the creativity begin!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Circle Stories

Sometime throughout the year, I have my Child Development students write a children’s book that they must read to the class as part of my literacy and reading to children unit. In the past, I’ve used Storybird as my platform. However, with this particular group of artistically talented students, I wanted to have them write and illustrate their own stories. Not just any type of story, but a “circle story”! In addition, I wanted them to apply the characteristics of reading aloud as well as incorporate technology. Continue to read to find out how all of this was accomplished…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email