Category: Nutrition

Stoplight Foods & Jenga Review Game

The stoplight is such a simple traffic device, but has a universal meaning to pedestrians and drivers in the world of transportation. You may also be familiar with this concept in the nutrition world as it was introduced a few years ago as “Go-Slow-Whoa” or “Stoplight Nutrition”. In order to reinforce healthy food choices, why not implement the universal meaning of the stoplight into an interactive Jenga game?  It’s a simple way to reinforce healthy food choices for all age groups.

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Teaching About Vegetables

After teaching this unit last year, I knew I had to update my vegetable lessons and activities, especially since we are a 1:1 school with iPads!  So, I’ve spent the better part of six months trying to figure out how to make this unit more engaging, both with and without technology! I am super pleased with the results, as are my students!  These lessons focus on students’ preexisting knowledge of vegetables, the consumption of vegetables (habits as well as reasons to consume), nutritional value and subgroups and vegetable classifications. Because knife skills are used in the lab options, be sure to cover that information prior to the lab(s)

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You Be the Dietician–Breakfast Foods

Do you teach an Advanced Foods and Nutrition class?  Looking for a rigorous assignment for students who have a strong understanding of the nutrients? You are in luck as Nikki Heflin, a Family and Consumer Sciences teacher of Indiana shares this breakfast lesson, several lab ideas and concluding assessment, placing students in the role of the dietician.  Check out her lesson below!

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Exploring Pasta

Pasta is one of my all time favorite units to teach in my Foods unit! Pasta is so easy, versatile, and economical that I feel every student should know how to prepare before they leave high school! I always tell my students that they will never go hungry if they know how to cook pasta. Use the provided slide to navigate through a variety of resources to learn more about pasta as your students complete this assignment and work their way into the lab.

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SKITCH: Food Label Information–Mandatory or Voluntary?

One of the first apps we were introduced to when our school went 1:1 was SKITCH. I liked the labeling abilities of this app directly on images and thought it would be a great addition to my junior high lessons. So, I developed this activity around mandatory and voluntary label information that allows students to practice applying the information from their notes directly onto a photo label, showing me they understand the concept. This activity also allowed me to go more paperless as this lesson only uses a half-sheet of paper per student. So, if you’ve never tried this app, here’s an opportunity for you to do so!

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Real Food Grows

Patricia Papazoglou of Beloit, Wisconsin shared this impressive website, Real Food Grows!  The website is an 8 week course covering nutrition and basic cooking skills for healthy living.  I took some time to really explore this website and it’s chock-full of relevant information to teach topics such as sports nutrition, food borne illness, nutrients, grains, proteins, sustainability and culminates with a cookbook project.  There is even a sequence guide provided if you’re not sure how to order the unit of plans.

The website is set up in an organized, easy to use, tab friendly format with links embedded throughout.  This would be an excellent resource for a beginning teacher, as well as a veteran teacher who needs to update their curriculum and interject some fresh ideas!  So, what are you waiting for?  Check it out and see what it has to offer!

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The Digestion Project

There is a huge emphasis on student directed learning and that meant that I would need to change the way I taught digestion. Sure, I could teach the process, all the organs and their functions to my students in a PPT and then give them a test, but that would not be very engaging, creative or student directed in any way. So, below is the new way I will be having my students learn about digestion.

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Nutrient Stations

When I created QR Code Stations in my child development class to learn about newborn care, I had no idea that they would be such a hit! My students really like getting out of their seats, moving from station to station in order to learn about various topics. So, I decided to give it a try with the essential six nutrients and the results proved to be successful once again. So, below you will find a new lesson about the essential six nutrients, utilizing the infamous QR Codes!

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Dietary Guideline Challenge Activities

Most FACS teachers are familiar with the Dietary Guidelines and know that they are reviewed and revised, if necessary, every five years. Students, on the other hand, are not as familiar with this concept. Unfortunately, it can be a difficult concept to teach, not because it’s complicated, but because it can be “dry” subject matter! In the past, when trying to teach this concept, students would get this distant, glazed look over their faces indicating to me that I was losing them! This “look” prompted me to develop something more interactive and student driven before even attempting to discuss the dietary guidelines, especially since we are a 1:1 school. This post shares those activities so you too can avoid the “look”! If you have additional, activities for teaching this concept, please share in the comment section below.

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Salads in a Jar

One of my classes was on the small side this year so I asked them if there was anything in particular they wanted to learn about regarding food. They very promptly provided me with a list! I wish I could get some of their assignments that quickly! LOL! Anyway, one of the items on their list was salads…in a jar! Having been to a salad in a jar party where each person brought an ingredient to share, I thought this would be a fun lesson and lab to put together. I also thought I’d try my hand at putting the lesson together as a HyperDoc where students could work their way through the background information in an independent, self-directed way. Even if you don’t feel comfortable giving students the HyperDoc, I find it’s a great way to keep myself and my resources organized!

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