A Taste of Herbs & Spices

herbs.and.spices

There are so many herbs and spices out there that it’s hard to know where to start! In the past, I’ve had my students pick an herb or spice to research and present to the rest of the class. While that was okay, I wanted something a little more “spicy” (pardon my pun) and interactive. After wracking my brain for how I was going to do this, I put it aside for a while. Finally, after months of mulling this over in my head, the following activities and labs came to fruition and were worth the wait! I hope your students like it as much as mine did!

Handling Temper Tantrums

temper.tantrum

The bane of every parent or caregiver is the temper tantrum! Temper tantrums are a normal part of every child’s behavior during the terrible two’s and trying three’s! So, how do we handle them when they occur? Let students build an arsenal of techniques as they explore what’s appropriate and inappropriate in the lesson and activity below.

Meat Unit: Resources & Labs

Meat.Unit

Thinking about teaching a unit on meat such as beef, pork or lamb and need ideas? Look no further! Below are resources that may be helpful to you in the planning of lessons. If you have additional ideas or resources, please share in the comment section below.

Family Crises Awareness Quilt Project

quilt.blocks

When teaching about families in crisis I like to specifically focus on a select few that often vary from one year to the next. quilt.blocks. However, I also like students to be aware that there are a multitude of crises that families can face throughout their lives. In order to make them aware, I like to have students select a crisis and find an article about it to read and summarize. After summarizing and connecting their feelings to the issue, I like to have them make a classroom quilt square depicting their selected crisis. When put together, it makes a statement about specific crises and draws others in to make them aware of issues facing families today.

Hidden Hazards & Make Safe Happen App Review

make.safe.happen

This year my school decided to implement Professional Learning Communities, focusing on the Reading Apprenticeship model, in addition to using the Collins Writing program that was initiated last year. We have also been encouraged to be the “guide on the side” and have more student centered or directed learning taking place in our classrooms. With all of this in mind, my mission was to develop a couple of activities to try out the concepts in my child development class. A friend had just shared the Parenting magazine article on Hidden Hazards with me and it seemed like it would be a good fit. I’m glad to say I had very engaged students who were sharing, brainstorming, using technology and writing! Mission accomplished!

Reclaiming the Kitchen with Casseroles

casserole.photo

When I ask my students what they or their parents typically make for supper, I get a lot of similar responses. Most tell me they make and or eat whatever is easy, comes out of a box, comes out of the freezer, can be made in the microwave or picked up from a fast food restaurant on the way home. It’s so sad that convenience foods are so heavily relied on instead of preparing foods from scratch. This is one of the reasons I like teaching about casseroles! Not only are they easy to make, include a variety of foods and nutrients, but they can be made in advance, put in the freezer for future meals and convenience and because they get us in the kitchen cooking and using a lot of staple ingredients from the pantry. Way to go casseroles!

The Freshman 15 Game Board Project

Game.Boards

During my unit titled “Off to College”, we talk about a variety of topics related to college living and dorm life. One of these topics includes the “Freshmen 15”. Students always wonder if it’s true and if so, how does it happen. Since students were curious, I decided to let them figure out the answers by having them research the topic and create a game board that incorporated all of the information they learned in a fun, creative and competitive way. Students took turns playing each others games, providing feedback and learning something about the “Freshman 15”!